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Element 5: Positive behaviour management

The school community has a clear, coherent, documented approach to behaviour management that promotes positive student behaviour. This is supported by strategies and plans that engage students in respectful relationships, provide strong organisation in classroom and playground and effectively manage risk. This element is broken down into a number of key characteristics outlined below. Click on each characteristic to see examples of actions and practices for teachers and schools.

Examples of actions/practices include:

  • The school researches and considers evidence-informed and theoretically sound positive approaches to whole-school behaviour management. Schools may consider researching and adopting such approaches as:
    • positive behaviour support
    • restorative practices
    • programs that focus on recognition of pro-social behaviour and clear consequences for negative behaviour such as bullying.

Examples of actions/practices include:

  • Clearly articulated procedures for identifying and acknowledging students who display positive behaviour consistent with the school's values (e.g. through awards and recognition at assemblies).
  • School leadership monitors implementation of these procedures so that they are perceived as valued, fair, transparent and consistent across the school.
  • The school plans strategies for helping students achieve goals relating to improvement in positive behaviour. This includes explicitly teaching social-emotional skills such as problem solving and encouraging students to accept greater personal responsibility for their actions.
  • The school facilitates student engagement and participation in clubs, committees or action teams that focus on prosocial values (e.g. compassion, fairness and respect).

Examples of actions/practices include:

  • All teachers have a sound knowledge of the core elements of the school's positive behaviour approach and access to good resources that support this.
  • Strategies for monitoring consistency in the use of the school's approach are in place e.g. seeking feedback from staff, students, parents and carers about the effectiveness and implementation of the approach.
  • Teachers use classroom management strategies that are either linked to the school's overall approach or are consistent with it and share ideas for promoting positive behaviour.

Examples of actions/practices include:

  • The school playground is attractive and stimulating and there is enough equipment (e.g. game markings on the bitumen, basketballs and rings) to go around. Safe and quiet areas are also available for the use of individual students or for organised clubs.
  • Students' views on improving the design and organisation of the playground are sought at regular intervals.
  • A range of formal and informal games are taught to students and sessions are organised in the playground, for example by older students.
  • There is extra vigilant supervision of high-risk areas (e.g. canteen queues, the oval, lining up to go inside, locker areas) and during high-risk times (e.g. during group work).
  • The names of teachers on playground duty are clearly posted for students to see and the teachers are easily identifiable (e.g. by wearing fluorescent vests).
  • The library and 'safe' rooms (i.e. closely supervised spaces) are available for student use at lunchtime.
  • Teachers on playground duty record negative or concerning behaviours.
  • Teachers monitor student use of mobile phones and computers to ensure consistency with the school's policy and procedures.

Examples of actions/practices include:

  • Risk prevention plans are developed for outside school hours and off campus school activities to ensure students know and practice appropriate behaviours in a range of social settings.
  • Teachers anticipate potential risks from prior risk assessments and plan strategies for minimising these risks.
  • Expectations for appropriate behaviour, including the use of technology outside school hours are communicated to students and their families on a regular basis.
  • Students participate in development of expectations for behaviour out of school and identifying consequences when these expectations are not met.
  • Expectations for student behaviour in off-campus activities, (e.g. school campus and excursions) are clearly communicated to students, parents and carers. Consequences for failing to meet these expectations are also clearly communicated.

(Source: Safe Schools Hub ).